Helping You Bake The Perfect Cheesecake With Our Cheesecake Pan!

The Cheesecake Moat



Delicious Cheesecake Comments Off

Posted on June 26, 2012 by The Cheesecake Guy

Delicious Cheesecake

Arizona Sunset Cheesecake

Shortbread Crust

1 1/2 c Flour

1/2 c Finely ground pecans

1/3 c Sugar

1 lg Egg, separated

1/2 c Butter, softened

Cranberry Glaze Filling

1 cn Whole berry cranberry- sauce OR 2 cups cranberry orange relish

2 tb Sugar

1 tb Cornstarch

1 tb Grated lemon zest

1 tb Lemon juice

White Chocolate Filling

1 1/2 c Fresh orange juice

1-3 Inch x 1 inch piece- of orange peel (orange part only)

4 8 oz pkgs cream cheese

2/3 c Sugar

1 tb Grated orange zest

2 tb Cranberry Liqueur (such- as Crantasia Schnapps)

8 oz White chocolate, melted

4 Eggs

Candied Orange Topping

4 c Water

2 c Sugar

3 Seedless oranges (unpeeled)- cut into paper-thin slices

Garnish

Whipped Cream

Shortbread Crust: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Working on a large flat surface, such as a pastry board, place flour, pecans, and sugar in the center of the surface and mix together. Form a small depression or well in the center of the mound. Add the egg yolk and the softened butter to the well, then blend these with the dry mixture. Mix the ingredients thoroughly using your hands — there is no substitute for warm hands. Shape the dough into a ball and wrap in plastic wrap.

Chill for at least 10 minutes. Roll out the dough to a thickness of about 1/4-inch. You should have a circle of about 11 inches in diameter. For best results, roll out your dough between 2 sheets of waxed paper, then peel away the paper and cut the crust in a 9 inch circle. Place the circle inside a 9 inch springform pan. Prick the crust several times with a fork to keep the crust from puffing up during the baking. Place the springform pan in the oven and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until light brown. Allow to cool. Using the leftover dough, line the sides of the springform pan. Press the dough against the sides of the pan, smoothing it so as to have a continuous layer of crust all the way around the sides of the pan. Make sure that the side crust meets the bottom crust all the way around. Brush the reserved egg white onto the shell, covering the bottom and sides. This will seal the dough and keep it from becoming soggy. Set aside until ready to use.

Cranberry Glaze Filling: Mix the sugar and cornstarch together in a small saucepan. Stir in the cranberry sauce. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thick. Stir in the lemon zest and lemon juice. Set aside to cool slightly. White Chocolate Filling: Reset the oven to 350 degrees F. Boil the orange juice and piece of orange peel in a heavy medium saucepan until the juice is reduced to 3 Tbsp – about 12 minutes. Remove and discard the strip of orange peel and set aside the reduced orange juice. Using an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese, sugar, grated orange zest, Crantasia, and reduced orange juice until smooth. Beat in the melted white chocolate and then the eggs, one at a time, beating just until combined. Pour the cranberry glaze filling into the prepared crust, spreading evenly. Pour the white chocolate filling over the cranberry layer and bake about 50 minutes (the top will be dry and the sides puffed slightly – the center will not be set). Move cheesecake to a wire rack and cool completely to room temperature. Chill in the refrigerator overnight.

Candied Oranges Topping: Cover a wire rack with waxed paper. Set aside. Combine the water and sugar in a heavy shallow wide skillet. Stir over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Simmer 5 minutes longer. Add the orange slices 1 at a time and adjust the heat so that the syrup bubbles only around the edges of the pan. Cook the oranges for one hour. Turn over the top layer of oranges and cook until the oranges are translucent and the orange peels tender, about another one hour longer. Lift and drain each orange slice out of the syrup, and arrange the slices in a single layer on the prepared rack. Let dry 1 hour. Boil the orange-sugar syrup until thick, about 6 minutes. Loosen and remove the sides of the springform pan. Set the cheesecake on a serving dish. Overlap the candied orange slices around the top of the cheesecake. Reheat the orange syrup, if necessary, and brush over the orange slices. Drizzle any remainder over each serving. Garnish: whipped cream.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Leong_Chee_Ken

 

How Our Cheesecake Pan Helps Bake The Best Cheesecake Comments Off

Posted on February 15, 2012 by The Cheesecake Guy

The Cheesecake Moat works wonders for baking cheesecakes for a very simple reason: it keeps the water bath separate from the cheesecake itself.

As anyone who has tried to bake a cheesecake knows, it’s almost impossible to keep the water out of a springform pan. And yet you need to use a springform pan to bake a cheesecake because of the consistency of the ingredients.

This is because a cheese cake is not really like a normal cake – the combined ingredients are more fluid than a cake made with flour.  A cheesecake needs support on the outside to keep it all together until it’s done baking and cools off. Not to mention that a cheesecake is relatively fragile and cannot handle being flipped or dumped out of a regular cake pan.

A slice of cheesecake made with our own cheesecake pan - The Cheesecake Moat. Notice how there's no cracking?

So, you need a springform pan to keep the cheesecake together throughout the baking process. You also need a water bath to keep the cheesecake moist while baking. How do you “build a better mousetrap”, i.e. bake a better cheesecake?

The answer is very simple when you think about it. You make a cheesecake pan that is actually two pans; one for the outer water bath and one for the cheesecake itself. That’s what the Cheesecake Moat is.

Your preparations can still be the same, you can use the same recipes you have in the past. You can use any cheesecake recipes you dig up online or in cookbooks. You assemble the ingredients the same way you would, you use the same springform pan and everything.

The only difference (and it’s a big difference in the end) comes during the baking process. Once you have your cheesecake prepared in a springform pan, you fill the outer part with water and put the springform pan into the Cheesecake Moat.

Two types of cheesecakes made using the Cheesecake Moat pan. It helps provide a more even temperature through the baking process as well as keep the water out of the springform pan!

Included with the Moat are specific instructions using Chef Corky Rosen’s own recipe.

Yes, you can bake a good cheesecake using just a springform pan. But if you want to make a great cheesecake, an investment in the Cheesecake Moat is well worth it!

Click here to order now or for more information!

Cheesecake Recipe: New York Cheesecake Comments Off

Posted on February 10, 2012 by The Cheesecake Guy

Don’t be put off by the orange extract. There’s just enough there to give it a bit of dimension.

Ultimate New York Style Cheesecake With Shortbread Crust

Of course, you may want to use our patented Cheesecake Moat for OPTIMAL results, as it helps you achieve a perfect crust and have less cracks in the cake, less sogginess throughout, etc. A springform pan may be used for this cheesecake recipe as well.

Crust:
2 1/2 cup flour, all-purpose
1 1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup sugar
2 large egg yolks
1/4 teaspoon orange extract
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Note: This makes plenty of crust — you may have some leftover, but it’s better to have too much than too little

Filling:
5 packages cream cheese ( 8 oz each)
1 3/4 cups sugar
1/4 cup heavy cream
3 tablespoons flour
2 large egg yoks
5 large eggs
1 teaspoon lemon extract
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon orange extract

Prepare crust: In large bowl, with mixer at low speed, beat flour, butter, sugar, egg yolk and lemon extract until well mixed. Shape dough into ball; wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 400-degrees. Press 1/3 of dough onto bottom of 10″ x 2 1/2″ springform pan; keep remaining dough refrigerated.

Bake crust 8-10 minutes ot until golden; Cool. Turn oven control to 475-degrees.

While crust is cooling, prepare filling: In large bowl, with mixer at medium speed, beat cream cheese just until smooth; slowly beat in sugar, scraping bowl often with rubber spatula. Using VERY low speed or a wooden spoon, add cream, flour, egg yolks, eggs and extracts; beat until smooth — do not over beat after adding eggs.

Press remaining dough around sides of pan to within 1-inch of top. Pour cream cheese mixture into crust.

Bake cheesecake 12 minutes. Turn oven control to 300-degrees; bake 35 minutes longer. Turn off oven; let cheesecake remain in oven 30 minutes.

Remove cheesecake from oven; cool completely in pan on wire rack. Cover and refrigerate at least 4 hours or until well chilled.

When cheesecake is firm, loosen sides of  the cheesecake pan.

If possible, chill overnight.

Finally —- ENJOY! Nom nom nom…

Say Goodbye To The Springform Pan and Make The Best Cheesecake! Comments Off

Posted on January 23, 2012 by The Cheesecake Guy

Most people bake cheesecakes using a springform pan. The springform pan is a pan that that has a clip on the outside that lets you “open” the pan up when the cheesecake is done baking. The purpose with it is to be able to just remove the pan from the outside – not to flip the pan over in order to remove the cheesecake.

Doesn't it look delicious? You too can make your own cheesecake like this - all you need is the Cheesecake Moat!

This is done because a cheesecake isn’t really a normal cake. They can actually be considered more of a torte or custard pie. This means that they’re a bit more fragile than a cake and might not survive the ordeal of being flipped and dropped out of a pan – however gently you might be able to do it.

So for many years, a springform pan was the height of cheesecake baking technology. And yes, there is such a thing as that!

The problem that comes about with that technique is that, due to the nature of the springform pan, water can seep into the cheesecake. There’s a water bath that is used to bake the cheesecake evenly and keep it moist at the same time. Since the springform pan doesn’t close completely outside of the cheesecake, water has a tendency to seep in, no matter how tightly you wrap the cake with aluminum foil.

Well, we’ve come up with a simple yet clever solution. Our engineers thought, “why not keep the water bath separate from the cheesecake?” They came up with the Cheesecake Moat – an awesome invention that allows for the best of all worlds.

There’s a moat, or outer rim that allows for the water bath that bakes the cheesecake evenly. Being contained in this “moat”, the water bath can never, ever seep into the cheesecake. This allows it to bake evenly and not develop cracks.

So many people have been raving about our product that they’ve thrown away their springform pan! If you plan on baking several cheesecakes, it’ll pay for itself in no time. Please check around the rest of our site and see for yourself. Many people love our product and we hope you do too!

So just say no to the springform pan and say hello to the Cheesecake Moat!

The Best Cheesecake Pan Ever! Comments Off

Posted on January 18, 2012 by The Cheesecake Guy

The Cheesecake Moat is a cheesecake pan that will help you bake the perfect cheesecake – every time! Included is a recipe from top Chef Corky Rosen, the co-developer of the Cheesecake Moat.

The best cheesecake pan that helps you bake the perfect cheesecake!

Chef Rosen says that he’s dealt with all the problems that go along with making a cheesecake, including the usage of a springform pan, and firmly believes that the Cheesecake Moat eliminates all of those problems!

The Cheescake Moat is a pan that allows for an outer water bath that keeps the cheesecake moist, but unlike a springform pan the water doesn’t seep into the cheesecake.

You can easily remove the cheesecake from the Cheesecake Moat as well. You use a springform pan inside of the Moat’s inner 12″ pan. The outer 14″ ring (or moat) is where the water bath resides. When done cooking, you simply remove the springform pan, and voila – the perfect cheesecake!

For more info, check out these posts:

The Problem With Springform Pans In Baking A Cheesecake
How the Cheesecake Moat Helps You Bake The Perfect Cheesecake
How Our Cheesecake Pan Helps Bake The Best Cheesecake

Or click here to order the perfect cheesecake pan today!

 

The Problem With Springform Pans In Baking A Cheesecake Comments Off

Posted on January 17, 2012 by The Cheesecake Guy

We all want to make that perfect cheesecake – the kind you’d buy at The Cheesecake Factory. A mouth-watering cheesecake with that crisp graham cracker crust, with smooth and uncracked surface. A cheesecake that is just the perfect amount of moist and has entirely too many calories, yet you frankly don’t care – after all, you tell yourself you’ll hit the gym to work it off. And you’re going to, right?

Ok, so maybe not, but that slice of cheesecake is worth it, it’s a slice of heaven that thrills your taste buds. And the Cheesecake Moat can help you get it right EVERY TIME.

Some may think we speak in hyperbole, but it’s entirely true. The Cheesecake Moat can help you bake a cheesecake as good as the Cheesecake Factory every time you try. Why pay the exorbitant prices for other people’s cheesecake when you can make you own time and time again? The Cheesecake Moat pays for itself after making just a few cheesecakes.

How does the Cheesecake Moat help me make the perfect cheesecake?

First let’s look at the water bath. Most cheesecakes are baked in a springform pan, inside of another pan filled with water. The water bath is to help keep the cheesecake bake evenly, keep it moist, and to help avoid cracking and souffleing. This water bath keeps things at an even temperature – as water will never get hotter than 212 degrees fahrenheit (or else it will boil – 212 degrees is the boiling point, or 100 degrees celsius). The water bath helps ensure that the outer edge of the cheesecake won’t bake faster than the center. This is what causes sinking and cracks in the cheesecake.

Well, the problem with a standard setup (a springform pan in a water bath) is that no matter how hard you try, water seems to always seep into the cheesecake pan. All springform pans leak, almost by design. Sure, they do a good job of holding the cake together and releasing it when done cooking, but they *cannot* keep water out. This leads to a soggy crust.

The Cheesecake Moat solves this problem by having an outer moat for the water bath. Yes, hence the name Cheesecake Moat. It’s really a very simple yet elegant solution.

More to come soon, but please let us know if you have any questions or have used the Cheesecake Moat and what your thoughts are!

 



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